Michael Sweeney's OMET website

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Action Research

 

What is Action Research? The definition at I selected for the our blackboard discussion is as follows:

"Action research is a disciplined process of inquiry conducted by and for those taking action.  The primary reason for engaging in action research is to assist the "actor" in the improving and/or refining his or her actions."

Richard Sager, (2000), Guiding School Improvement with Action Research, retrieved August 2, 2004, http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/100047/chapter1.html

This definition is somewhat vague, but does communicate an essential characteristic of action research. In action research, the researcher is very much at the center of his/her study. The process is cyclic involving stages of planning, taking action, evaluating the action, diagnosing the action, then planning again, etc.